Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: At the Moulin Rouge -The Dance (1890)

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At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1890) Philadelphia Museum of Art, [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
At the Moulin Rouge, the Dance is an oil-on-canvas painted by French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. It was painted in 1890, and is the second of a number of graphic paintings by Toulouse-Lautrec depicting the Moulin Rouge cabaret built in Paris in 1889. It portrays two dancers dancing the can-can in the middle of the crowded dance hall. A recently discovered inscription by Toulouse-Lautrec on the back of the painting reads: “The instruction of the new ones by Valentine the Boneless.”[1] This means that the man to the left of the woman dancing, is Valentin le désossé, a well-known dancer at the Moulin Rouge, and he is teaching the newest addition to the cabaret. To the right, is a mysterious aristocratic women in pink. The background also features many aristocratic people such as poet Edward Yeats, the club owner and even Toulouse-Lautrec’s father. The work is currently displayed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Quote from wikipedia

Click for enlarged detail:

 

From the collection of

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Details
  • Title: At the Moulin Rouge: The Dance
  • Date: 1890
  • Location: Paris, France
  • Physical Dimensions: w59 x h45.51 in (Overall)
  • Artist/Maker: Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, French, 1864 – 1901
  • Type: Paintings
  • Credit Line: The Henry P. McIlhenny Collection in memory of Frances P. McIlhenny, 1986

Image credit: [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons,

Sources:

Google Art Project

Philadelphia Museum of Art

wikipedia

 

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