Cap’s Blog: Greensleeves VII

Claudio Capriolo at Cap’s Blog writes,

 

For me, the most beautiful song of all time is ‘Greensleeves’.” 

 

In fact, he has written at least sixteen posts on themes related to this song. Today, I choose Greensleeves VII because this medley contains an astonishing mixture of styles featuring lute and baroque guitar by George Weigand and tenor by Paul Elliott that I particularly enjoy. Let’s listen to one version of “the most beautiful song of all time.”          ~ Highly Recommend! 🙂

 

 

Read Claudio’s excellent commentary via Greensleeves VII.

 

….The last track of the anthology, which I am presenting here for your attention, is dedicated to Greensleeves .

Includes, in order:

  1.  an improvisation on the passamezzo antico, performed in lute by George Weigand;
  2. [at 1:13] Greensleeves , the oldest known version of the melody with the oldest known version of the text (*), sung by Paul Elliott accompanied by Weigand’s lute;
  3. [at 4:07] the instrumental version of William Cobbold (1560-1639), with improvisations performed by Weigand on the baroque guitar and Rosemary Thorndycraft on bass viol;
  4. [at 5:27] the version of Beggar’s Opera that we already know , still interpreted by Elliott;
  5. [at 6:03] a “medley” of Irish jigs performed by Barlow on the flute and Alastair McLachlan on the violin.***

Continue reading Cap’s Blog via Greensleeves VII

***(used Google translate from original Italian)

Claudio has kindly clarified a point of translation:

I have to make a slight adjustment. You cannot translate “passamezzo antico”: this is the name of an italian dance form that provided the bass line on which the tune of Greensleeves is built – as well as other british songs of the same era, such as The oak and the ash:
Cheers 🙂

Many thanks, Claudio!! 😎

Image Source:

My Lady Greensleeves,1863, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, oil on panel, 33 x 27.3 cm (13 x 10 3/4 in.) ,[Public domain], Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Bequest of Grenville L. Winthrop, Image Source: Wikimedia

Thanks for Visiting! 🙂

The End

10 Comments Add yours

    1. I’m convinced, too! Thanks for visiting, grAnnie Roo. 🙂

      Like

  1. Thank you! I am very pleased about the attention you paid to my blog 🙂
    I love Greensleeves because many years ago, trying to trace its origins, I discovered the world of early music, which enchanted me.
    I think that Greensleeves is unique: it is four hundred years old, but is still sung and loved today: what a rare and wonderful thing!.
    Best regards.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My pleasure, Claudio! Your blog is a treasure trove, and learning from you about the history of this remarkable song is a privilege. Yes, it is, indeed, a rare and wonderful thing! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I have to make a slight adjustment. You cannot translate “passamezzo antico”: this is the name of an italian dance form that provided the bass line on which the tune of Greensleeves is built – as well as other british songs of the same era, such as The oak and the ash:
    https://clamarcap.com/2013/06/19/the-oak-and-the-ash/
    Cheers 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you!! I always have great fear when letting google give me words about subjects new to me. I will copy and paste this into the body so that all can follow. I appreciate your help, Claudio. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Colors on the painting, particularly darkish red, are stunning. Love the piece as well 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi VoFL! My sentiments exactly. Thanks so much for commenting! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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