Ford Madox Brown: Work (1865)

Read More Ford Madox Brown at wikiwand More about this painting at wikiwand See More Ford Madox Brown at ArtUK Ford Madox Brown at wikimedia Thanks for Visiting 🙂 ~Sunnyside

The Curse of the Lady of Shalott

Read More John William Waterhouse at wikiwand The Lady of Shalott at wikiwand See More Tag: John William Waterhouse At Sunnyside John William Waterhouse at wikimedia commons John William Waterhouse at Christie’s John William Waterhouse at Sotheby’s Thanks for Visiting 🙂 ~Sunnyside

Donna Stewart: The Wexford Carol

Good people all, this Christmas time, Consider well and bear in mind What our good God for us has done In sending his beloved son With Mary holy we should pray, To God with love this Christmas Day In Bethlehem upon that morn, There was a blessed Messiah born. The night before that happy tide,…

John William Waterhouse: Juliet

“Here we see a lovely girl wearing a richly-coloured gown that closely resembles Mariana’s in its cut. Endowed with unusually curly hair (for Waterhouse), Juliet grasps her luxurious blue necklace nervously. She is presented in the full profile perfected by Italian Renaissance artists; for most of the 15th Century, privileged maidens ready to be married…

Leaving Home: Ford Madox Brown’s The Last of England (1855)

Read More The Last of England at wikiwand Ford Madox Brown at wikiwand Masterpiece Story: The Last of England by Ford Madox Brown, by James Singer at DailyArt The Last of England at Khan Academy See More Ford Madox Brown at ArtUK Ford Madox Brown at wikimedia A watercolor version of The Last of England…

Dame Laura Knight: Sunday afternoon in Hyde Park

Read More Dame Laura Knight: the artist who declared, ‘I paint today’ Dame Laura Knight at wikiwand See More Tag: Dame Laura Knight At Sunnyside Dame Laura Knight at ArtUK Laura Knight at Sotheby’s Laura Knight at Christie’s Learn More A Tragic Life: Florence Carter-Wood Thanks for Visiting 🙂 ~Sunnyside

Dame Laura Knight: ‘I Paint Today’

“At the Edge of the Cliff is one of the strongest works in this clifftop series. The young woman in her striking striped blue and white skirt and white jumper has a timeless quality to her, her outfit feeling as modern to a contemporary audience as it did over 100 years ago. She stands on the…

Alfred Sisley: Matinée d’octobre près de Port-Marly (c1876)

“Painted following the First Impressionist Exhibition in April 1874—which had opened the eyes of the public to the revolutionary Impressionist aesthetic—and around the time of its second iteration which helped cement the validity of its new, modern terminology, Matinée d’octobre près de Port-Marly pays fitting homage to the movement’s pursuit of painting en plein air. Determined to capture…

Debussy’s Clair de Lune II

Clair de Lune Your soul is a chosen landscape On which masks and Bergamasques cast enchantment as they go, Playing the lute, and dancing, and all but Sad beneath their fantasy-disguises. Singing all the while, in the minor mode, Of all-conquering love and life so kind to them They do not seem to believe in…

Without Hands: Sarah Biffin II

Click here to listen to artist Alison Lapper and portrait miniatures specialist Emma Rutherford discussing the art of Sarah Biffin on the eve of the opening of “Without Hands”: The Art of Sarah Biffin. The exhibition is dedicated to the life and artistic achievemtns of this remarkable artist and is accompanied by a comprehensive catalogue as well…

Gerald Leslie Brockhurst: The War Widow (1923)

This painting was originally titled Andromache by the artist when it was painted in circa 1923 [fig. 1]. This initial title references the Greek princess recorded in Homer’s Iliad, who lost every male member of her family during the Trojan War. This portrait, painted in the aftermath of the Second World War, consequently assumes a…

Without Hands: Sarah Biffin I

“Made to accompany the exhibition “Without Hands”: The Art of Sarah Biffin (from 1 November until 21 December, 2022), this film traces the life and art of this remarkable artist and reveals how Philip Mould & Company weaved the pieces of her untold story. Sarah Biffin (1784-1850) is one of history’s most resolute, entrepreneurial, and…

Autumn: Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Leo Putz

Autumn Song By Dante Gabriel Rossetti Know’st thou not at the fall of the leaf How the heart feels a languid grief Laid on it for a covering, And how sleep seems a goodly thing In Autumn at the fall of the leaf? And how the swift beat of the brain Falters because it is…

Cyprien Katsaris: Schumann, Kinderszenen, Op. 15

0:09– From foreign Lands and People 2:11– Curious Story 3:09– Catch me if you can 3:38– Entreating Child 4:25– Perfect Happiness 5:48– An Important Event 6:40– Dreaming 9:33– By the Fireside 10:19– Knight of the Rocking-Horse 10:53– Almost too serious 12:40– Frightening 14:08– Child falling asleep 16:32– The Poet Speaks Hat Tip Many thanks to…

James Jebusa Shannon: The Flower Girl (1900)

“Painted while the artist and his family were on holiday at Eastbourne in 1900. The woman was a flower girl whom they met regularly every morning on their way down to the beach; she consented to sit to Shannon in her ordinary working clothes and is shown nursing her baby. The artist’s daughter Kitty (op….

George Clausen: Brown Eyes (1891)

“Clausen studied in France and painted open-air ‘rural naturalist’ subjects in an impressionist style. In 1886 he helped to found the New English Art Club as an alternative exhibition venue to the Royal Academy. This is a portrait of a local girl from the village of Cookham in Berkshire, where the artist was living. The…

John Singer Sargent: Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1885-86)

The title comes from the song ‘The Wreath’, by the eighteenth-century composer of operas Joseph Mazzinghi, which was popular in the 1880s. Sargent and his circle frequently sang around the piano at Broadway. The refrain of the song asks the question ‘Have you seen my Flora pass this way?’ to which the answer is ‘Carnation,…

Isobel Lilian Gloag: Four Corners to my Bed

  ‘Four corners to my bed Four angels round my head Matthew, Mark, Luke & John Bless the bed that I lie on’ What Does This Mean? James Greig explains this rhyme in his essay “Isobel Lilian Gloag and Her Work“,  published in The Magazine of Art, Volume 26 in 1902: ” [This] is a…

Hauser & Trotovsek: Passacaglia

“In many of his late paintings, Turner used vigorous brushstrokes and loosely defined forms to explore dramatic struggles between human beings and the elements. This work shows a storm raging in an English harbor town. Flares explode in the sky to alert ships to the location of shallow (shoal) water. On the shore huddled spectators…

Cedric Morris: May Flowering Irises No. 2 (1935)

“By 1935, when this work was painted, Morris’s fascination with irises had firmly taken hold. He established a studio in the garden where he would sit and paint his flower subjects for days on end, and one ex-student, Joan Warburton, poignantly reminisced how ‘to go in there quietly when Cedric was painting the favourite of…

Dame Laura Knight: The Fairgrounds, Penzance (c.1916)

Who Was Dame Laura Knight? Dame Laura Knight (1877-1970) was an English artist in the figurative, realist tradition who embraced English Impressionism. According to Tate.org “Influenced by Impressionism and the Newlyn School in Cornwall, Knight’s subject-matter is contemporary without being avant-garde. Dismissed by Modernists for her lack of interest in formal experiment, Knight’s insistent realism…

Marie Spartali Stillman: Beatrice (1895)

Who Is Maria Spartali Stillman? Marie Euphrosyne Spartali, later Stillman, (1844 –1927), was a British Pre-Raphaelite painter and model, arguably the greatest female artist of that movement. During a sixty-year career, she produced over one hundred and fifty works, contributing regularly to exhibitions in Great Britain and the United States. (2) One Dante Is Never…

Sir Alfred James Munnings: The Boathouse (1906)

Munning’s Earliest Boating Theme According to Christie’s, Idle Moments; or The Boathouse (1906) “is the earliest boating theme, foreshadowing [Sir Alfred James Munnings’] series of ladies in canoes painted in the 1930’s and 40’s.”  The description continues: This scene is the boathouse at Mendham … The lady in the back reclines and contentedly settles in…

Ambrose McEvoy: Portrait of Lady Gwendoline Churchill (1917)

When this work was exhibited at the New English Art Club just after Ambrose McEvoy’s shocking and sudden death of pneumonia at the age of only forty-nine, the Times critic praised the painting – which had been given pride of place in the exhibition – for serving ‘very well to recall the characteristic powers of…

The Real Ophelia

The scene depicted is from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Act IV, Scene vii, in which Ophelia, driven out of her mind when her father is murdered by her lover Hamlet, falls into a stream and drowns: There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weedsClambering to hang, an envious sliver broke;When down her weedy trophies and herselfFell in…

Sir Frank Brangwyn: Veronica Wipes the Face of Jesus

“After the First World War, Brangwyn was commissioned to produce Stations of the Cross for Arras cathedral through the recommendation of his friend Theophile Steinlen (1859-1923). Reproductions of the Stations were to be distributed to other war damaged churches. Unfortunately the series was never completed. It was generally reported that this was due to the…