Kathleen Munn, Part 1: Cows on a Hillside (c. 1916)

Who Is Kathleen Munn? Because I admire rebels, few artists have intrigued me to the same degree as the talented Canadian pioneer of modern art, Kathleen Jean Munn. Born into a Toronto family in 1887, Munn benefited from her family’s support in both her artistic education and career. Munn developed a devotion to international modernism…

Kathleen Munn: Horses (c.1927)

Kathleen Munn: Pioneer of Modern Art Kathleen Jean Munn (1887– October 19, 1974) is recognized today as a pioneer of modern art in Canada, though she remained on the periphery of the Canadian art scene during her lifetime. She imagined conventional subjects in a radically new visual vocabulary as she combined the traditions of European…

J.E.H. MacDonald: Maple Boughs, Algoma

  Click For Enlarged Detail     Details Maple Boughs, Algoma J.E.H. MacDonald, Medium: oil on composite wood-pulp board Credit Line: The Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario Dimensions Overall: 21.5 x 26.5 cm (8 7/16 x 10 7/16 in.) Source: Art Gallery of Ontario, Canada   Thanks for Visiting! 🙂 The End

Emily Carr: War Canoes, Alert Bay (1912)

  The Audain Art Museum’s Permanent Collection of nearly 200 works of art is a visual journey through the history of art from coastal British Columbia. Spanning from the 18th century to present day, the Collection contains one of the world’s finest collections of Northwest Coast First Nations masks; a large collection of works by…

Emily Carr: Forest Glade

“I sat staring, staring, staring – half lost, learning a new language, or rather the same language in a different dialect. So still were the big woods where I sat, sound might not yet have been born.” -Emily Carr   See Full Biography: Emily Carr: Who Is She?  

Emily Carr: Untitled forest scene (c1932)

  Emily Carr: On Jungles, January 1, 1936: “I painted one of the thick jungle sketches. Perhaps I am getting “junglier.” They won’t be popular. Few people know the jungle, or care about it or want to understand it. An organized tumult of growth, that’s what those thick undergrowth woods are, and yet there is…

Helen Galloway McNicoll, The Chintz Sofa (1913)

  Helen Galloway McNicoll, The Chintz Sofa (1913) Oil on canvas. (Canadian) 1879-1915 One of the foremost Canadian female practitioners of Impressionism in her time, McNicoll is known for her sunlight-infused genre paintings of women and children in rural environments. Here, she moved inside to depict a woman reading. Via books0977