Mary Cassatt: Lydia Crocheting in the Garden at Marly (1880)

“Cassatt and her family spent the summer of 1880 at Marly-le-Roi, about ten miles west of Paris. Ignoring the village’s historic landmarks in her art, Cassatt focused instead on the domestic environment. Here, she portrayed her elder sister, Lydia, fashionably dressed and insulated by a walled garden from any modern hurly-burly. Lydia is absorbed in…

Ambrose McEvoy: Lady Patricia Moore (c.1920)

“Despite being one of the most successful society portrait painters of his day, Ambrose McEvoy has until recently been overlooked. Born in 1877, McEvoy painted a plethora of important sitters throughout his career including Sir Winston Churchill and Lady Diana Cooper. McEvoy demonstrated exceptional artistic abilities from a young age. Encouraged by his father, Captain…

Nikolai Bogdanov-Belsky: Country Boys (1916)

Bogdanov-Belsky’s Best Bogdanov-Belsky’s pre-revolutionary works include some of his most striking canvases, the scale alone often an indication of his artistic confidence. The present lot is an exceptional example of the qualities that mark out these rare, early paintings – tight brushwork, vivid blues and greens, and an impact that would grow gradually more diffuse…

Renoir: Woman With a Cat (c.1875)

Click for Enlarged Detail slideshow best viewed At Sunnyside Hat Tip Art and Artists, Cats in Art part 2 Thanks for Visiting 🙂 ~Sunnyside

Philip Leslie Hale: The Rose Tree Girl (1922)

Boston School of Impressionists Philip Leslie Hale was a leading member of the Boston School of Impressionists, along with Edmund Tarbell, Frank Weston Benson, William McGregor Paxton and Joseph De Camp, among others. Following studies at the Art Students League in New York, Hale traveled abroad to Paris in 1887 to study at the Académie…

Mary Cassatt: The Tea (1880)

“Cassatt’s paintings often document the social interactions of well-to-do women like herself. The activities they depict—tea drinking, going to the theatre, tending children—fall within the normal routine for Cassatt’s sex and class. Yet the painter’s insistence upon representing such episodes from the modern world (even a sheltered segment of it), her dislike for narrative, and…

Camille Pissarro: The Boulevard Monmartre on a Winter Morning (1897)

After spending six years in rural Éragny, Pissarro returned to Paris, where he painted several series of the grands boulevards. Surveying the view from his lodgings at the Grand Hôtel de Russie in early 1897, Pissarro marveled that he could “see down the whole length of the boulevards” with “almost a bird’s-eye view of carriages,…

Sir Alfred Munnings: Langham Mill Pool

The Best of British Impressionism A strong supporter of en plein-air painting, Sir Alfred Munnings, “like the French Impressionist painters, … captures the salient qualities of form while conjuring the dramatic atmosphere of light, air, and colour.” Painted at a site only a few miles from his home, “Langham Mill Pool is an extraordinary example…

Gustave Caillebotte: Le Pont de l’Europe, esquisse (1876)

The painting depicts one of the engineering marvels of Caillebotte’s day, an immense bridge spanning the rail yards of the Gare Saint-Lazare. Two men gaze through the massive iron trellises of the bridge toward the depot, the roof of which is glimpsed between the X-shaped girders at the right. Rather than cloaking the latticework of…

Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Bal du moulin de la Galette (1876)

Renoir’s Masterpiece of Early Impressionism This painting is doubtless Renoir‘s most important work of the mid 1870’s and was shown at the Impressionist exhibition in 1877. Though some of his friends appear in the picture, Renoir’s main aim was to convey the vivacious and joyful atmosphere of this popular dance garden on the Butte Montmartre….

Caillebotte: Chrysanthemums in the Garden at Petit-Gennevilliers (1893)

This emphasis on flatness and relatively large areas of mostly solid color is also a major feature of the Japanese prints that captivated the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists. The references to Japanese art and culture don’t end there as the chrysanthemums themselves were, as Met Museum curator, Jane R. Becker points out, “prized at the time…