James Tissot: Chrysanthemums

James Tissot, Chrysanthemums, c. 1874–76, Oil on canvas. Acquired in honor of David S. Brooke (Institute Director, 1977–94), 1994. The Clark Art Institute, , Image Source: wikimedia

The woman in Chrysanthemums is almost overwhelmed by the brilliant blooms surrounding her. She has rolled up her sleeves to adjust a pot, her blurred features suggesting we have caught a glimpse of her in motion. Tissot staged this scene in the conservatory attached to his studio, a glass panel of which is visible in the picture’s top left corner. Conservatories were associated with the “cultivation” of proper Victorian women as well as with nurturing plants, associations that add nuance to this scene of intimate domesticity.

Clark Institute

Click For Enlarged Detail

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9 Comments Add yours

  1. Jim Wingrove says:

    beautiful, thanks 😊

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Jim Wingrove says:

        welcome, always great pictures

        Liked by 1 person

  2. A very beautiful painting.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. GOD!!! This is insanely beautiful on soooo many levels!!! Sigh. Thank You and Cheers!!! 🤗💖😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for visiting, forresting! 😎❤️

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My absolute pleasure! 🤗💖😊

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Hello there, I am so happy to see that you are still busy at things and posting beautiful beautiful blogs on art.
    Can you remind me how you go about doing the details of the paintings? I am working on something for Passion Week and would like to be able to do details of Christ on the Cross. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

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