Christmas Cards: Season’s Greetings from Edwardian New Zealand

HistorianRuby: An Historian’s Miscellany I’m delighted to share with you these colourful Christmas cards from the antipodes! This brief selection dates from 1900 – 1919 and the originals are stored in various repositories in New Zealand. New Zealand Christmas postcard circa 1905 – 1910 A parrot instead of robin redbreast? A parrot is not usually associated…

Harriet Powers’s Bible Quilt (1885-1886)

Who Is Harriet Powers? According to the National Museum of American History, “Harriet Powers, an African American farm woman of Clarke County, Georgia, made this quilt in about 1886. She exhibited it at the Athens Cotton Fair of 1886 where it captured the imagination of Jennie Smith, a young internationally-trained local artist. Of her discovery,…

Laura Bassi (1711-1778): First Female Professor — The History & Art Girl

Who Is Laura Bassi? Note from Sunnyside: This fascinating post by The History and Art Girl introduces the 18th Century Italian, Laura Bassi – experimental physicist, professor, wife, and mother –  and the second woman in recorded history to earn a PhD.  Bravo! The last couple of weeks I’ve been doing some reading about women…

Emily Carr: Alert Bay 1912

Details Artist: Emily Carr  (Canadian) Title: Alert Bay Date: 1912 Medium: Drawing Materials: watercolour over graphite on wove paper Dimensions: 76.3 x 53.2 cm Source: National Gallery of Canada Also See: Emily Carr: Who Is She?  

Asian Art: Porcelain Plate

the-met-art: Dish Period: Qing dynasty (1644–1911) Date: 19th century Culture: China Medium: Porcelain painted in overglaze polychrome enamels Dimensions: H. 2 in. (5.1 cm); Diam. 11.5 in. (29.2 cm) Classification: Ceramics Credit Line: Gift of Charles Stewart Smith, 1893 Untitled Artwork, Asian Art http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/47454 Timeline of Art History (2000-present) Timelines Central and North Asia, 1800-1900…

Diamond Mountains, the Olympics, and Korean Art

“Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art,” a melancholy beauty of a show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, reveals the indelible influence of this mountain range on Korean painting from the 18th century to today.