Ambrose McEvoy: Lady Patricia Moore (c.1920)

Lady Patricia Moore c. 1920, by Ambrose McEvoy(1875-1927), Watercolor and pencil on heavy paper, 22 x 15 1/4 in (55.9 x 38.7 cm), Image Source: Philip Mould & Company

“Despite being one of the most successful society portrait painters of his day, Ambrose McEvoy has until recently been overlooked. Born in 1877, McEvoy painted a plethora of important sitters throughout his career including Sir Winston Churchill and Lady Diana Cooper.

McEvoy demonstrated exceptional artistic abilities from a young age. Encouraged by his father, Captain Charles Ambrose McEvoy, and inspired by his father’s great friend, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, McEvoy enrolled at the Slade School of Fine Art at the age of sixteen.[1] He studied at the Slade between 1893 and 1898, and became friends with contemporary Augustus Edwin John (1878-1961).”

Philip Mould and Company, Artist in Focus

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Philip Mould and Company, Ambrose McEvoy: Artist in Focus

Thanks for Visiting 🙂

~Sunnyside

19 Comments Add yours

  1. Olga Álvarez says:

    So contemporary, right? I loved the videos and I definitely like this artist. I learned

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes! I absolutely love his distinctive style! Thanks for visiting, Olga. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. That is an excellent portrait painting of Lady Patricia Moore. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for visiting, Dracul. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. shoreacres says:

    You’re expanding my horizons. This is another artist I’d not heard of: wonderful portraits.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. He is brand new to me, too, shoreacres. Thanks for visiting. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. WOWOW! He’s beyond amazing. Thank You!!! 💕

    Liked by 2 people

    1. My pleasure! Thanks for visiting, forresting. 🙂❤️

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My pleasure!!! 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Fascinating! Love the delicacy of his portraits. So glad that his works are now available to art lovers.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m glad, too! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Rosaliene. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Truly arresting portraits. Quite lovely.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for visiting and sharing your thoughts, Vivienne. 🙂

      Like

  7. kiangablog says:

    Thank you so much for bringing this extremely talented and beautiful artist to my attention. I sort of remember his name but your post really brings Ambrose’s work to life. I love his use of coloured electric light bulbs. Loved the video Divine People. So sad he only lived until he was 49 and at the peak of his career. Stunning artwork.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. My pleasure! I thought using those colored electric light bulbs was genius. I keep eyeing the book about McEvoy on the Philip Mould website – I would love to learn more about him. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, kiangablog. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. kiangablog says:

        I emailed my Dad your blog post. He loves his art and has been painting for many years especially after retiring from his journalism career. I will probably end up with a load of art books at some stage!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. lol…can’t have too many books – especially art books! 😎

        Liked by 1 person

  8. As others have said here, I’d not heard of Ambrose McEvoy. How quickly most people fade from view.
    In contrast, I have seen the presenter in the first video, Philip Mould, on the television series “Fake or Fortune.”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I love that show! Thanks for visiting, Steve. 🙂

      Like

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