Monet’s Grainstacks II

Claude Monet, Grainstack, 1891, oil on canvas, 73 x 92,5 cm, Signed and dated lower left: Claude Monet 91, Museum Barberini, Image Source: wikimedia

“Monet’s paintings from this series bear the French title Meules, a word that can be translated as “stacks.” For a long time the title was misinterpreted as Haystacks; however, the objects in Monet’s paintings are actually sheaves of grain. In the agriculture of nineteenth-century Normandy, conical stacks of unthreshed grain were covered with straw or hay to protect the valuable harvest from moisture and rot. Monet, who had a fine sensibility for the structure of the landscape, must have been fascinated by these quasi-sculptural objects of considerable size that appeared at the same time every year in the fields surrounding his house, covering the meadows in a kind of temporary installation. The motif also had symbolic character for the predominantly agricultural community of Giverny, and at the same time allowed Monet, by means of his serial approach, to explore the cyclical transformation of nature in the changing of the seasons—and with it the very passage of time.

This work has a special place among the twenty-five versions of grainstacks that Monet painted within the space of only a few months in 1890 and 1891. The strong visual diagonal introduces a dynamic element into the composition, which the artist strengthened by means of unusually intense colors and a backlit effect. More than any other version of the motif, the composition shows the influence of the colored Japanese woodcuts that Monet, like many of his fellow artists, so enthusiastically collected.”

Museum Barberini

See More

Claude Monet at Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris

List of Paintings by Claude Monet at wikiwand

Works by Claude Monet at Museum Barberini

Claude Monet at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Claude Monet at National Gallery of Art

Claude Monet at Art Institute of Chicago

Claude Monet at Philidelphia Museum of Art

Claude Monet at Kunsthaus Zurich

Claude Monet at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tag: Claude Monet At Sunnyside

Read More

Christie’s: One of the last of Monet’s momentous Grainstack series in private hands

Claude Monet at wikiwand

Thanks for Visiting 🙂

~Sunnyside

13 Comments Add yours

  1. Such richness to this painting!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I like to enlarge the image and enjoy all the tiny jewels left by each stroke of the brush. 😎

      Liked by 2 people

      1. There is always so much to appreciate!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Beautiful painting!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for visiting and sharing your thoughts, Mitzy. 🙂

      Like

  3. Anita Bacha says:

    Stunning artwork, Sunny 💗

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so pleased you enjoy this, too, Anita! 😎❤️🙏

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Anita Bacha says:

        Pleasure my dear friend 🧡🌹

        Liked by 1 person

  4. penwithlit says:

    Reblogged this on penwithlit and commented:
    Wonderful paintings!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. sienablue says:

    I am reading Ian Roberts book on mastering composition. The first exercise is to figure out the armature of some famous paintings. Here we have that strong diagonal but a fulcrum effect of the three puffy trees on the right against the massive foreground haystack on the left. Imagine the painting without those little wispy round three shapes and see how much engaging it would have been.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Fascinating! I really enjoy watching his free videos on youtube – great teacher. Thanks for sharing your experience, sienablue. 🙂

      Like

  6. The light effects in this painting are superb.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is what mesmerizes me. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Vivienne. 😎

      Like

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